Wednesday, April 3, 2019

Autism Myth Busting




Our Autism Awareness fundraising campaign is running and the word about it is spreading. I'm delighted so many people responded to it and expressed their support. Here is our next blogpost relating to autism discussing the myths surrounding it.

There are so many myths circulating about autism it’s sometimes hard to be sure what’s true, or what autism actually is. But I think that Autism Awareness Month is the perfect time to correct some of people’s misapprehensions—so here’s a handy list busting some of the most common myths about autism:

Myth: Autism is a bad thing.
Truth: Autism isn’t bad or good - it is a condition. While there are some aspects of life that are harder for autistics to deal with, there are also some benefits and positive aspects.

Myth: Autism is an illness.
Truth: Autism is a condition that is present from birth. No one is quite sure what causes it yet, but they think genetics have something to do with it. However, it is most certainly not an illness and can’t be caught from vaccines either.

Myth: Autistic people are unintelligent/stupid.
Truth: Autism brings with it just as many exceptional abilities as challenges. Many people with autism have normal to high IQs and some may excel at math, music or another pursuit. Lots of autistic people have highly intelligent and innovative ways of thinking, just have a great deal of difficulty communicating with the world around them or little interest in doing so. You shouldn’t judge a person based on their autism, just as you shouldn’t judge someone based on their gender or race. And just because someone’s mind works in a way different to yours, that doesn’t mean they are stupid — instead, you could make an effort to understand.

Myth: Only men can be autistic.
Truth: Autism is more commonly diagnosed in men, but it is thought to be equally prevalent among men and women. The reason women are less often diagnosed because autism has traditionally been seen as an extreme form of the male brain, and have lots of male coded traits. Often, autism and women manifests itself differently, including social masking of autistic traits.

Myth: Autistic people are bad employees.
Truth: Autistic people are fantastically innovative and valuable additions to your workplace. They help bring in new perspectives and ideas. Autistic brains work differently, not worse, than neurotypical ones; employing neurodiverse workers can bring lots of fresh potential into your workplace.

Myth: Autism only exists in children.
Truth: Children with autism grow up to become adults with autism. Autism affects people of all ages. It’s previously been ignored in adults, particularly those who have grown up masking their autistic traits. Previously, if you got through childhood without being diagnosed, your autism would go unacknowledged. Now, however, there are more opportunities for late diagnosis becoming available, and many say finding out that they are autistic has changed their lives.

Myth: Autism is caused by bad parenting.
Truth: In the 1950s, there was a theory suggesting that autism was caused by mothers who lacked emotional warmth. This has long been disproved. So far there isn’t explanation what is the cause of autism.

Myth: Autistic can’t feel or express emotions
Truth: Autism doesn’t make an individual unable to feel the emotions you feel, it just makes the person communicate emotions (and perceive your expressions) in different ways. Autism often affects an individual’s ability to understand unspoken interpersonal communication, so someone with autism might not detect sadness based solely on one’s body language or sarcasm in one’s tone of voice. But, when emotions are communicated more directly, people with autism are much more likely to feel empathy and compassion for others. Also, autistic are able to learn ‘reading’ emotions and face expressions.

Would you like to add any more? Which myth affects you most? Share your views in comments.

And... another treat for you from our dedicated Autism Awareness Jewellery Collection -

 Sterling Silver Jigsaw Piece Stud Earrings


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UPDATE - we have a winner!


Thank you all for taking part in my giveaway which was my first, but certainly not the last!  Keep checking my blog for more competitions coming.  


Silver Puzzle Piece Studs

44 comments:

  1. Autism has always been a 'puzzle' to me. I live in a very small village and I know of three families that are affected by it but I've never understood it. Thanks to your post and this campaign I like to think that I am better educated. Many thanks.

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  2. Courage strength and health - together we are strong

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  3. Courage, support and positivity x

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  4. It is symbolic and a great way to highlight Autism Awareness.

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  5. It means solidarity and understanding.

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  6. My teenage daughter was diagnosed with autism last year, she is an intelligent and strong young lady. To me it now means a great deal

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  7. Courage, intelligence, stigma ( none)

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  8. This is all raising awareness which is good. x

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  9. Good raising of awareness. Much needed!

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  10. This is a great article highlighting many of the struggles that people with autism go through on a daily basis but it also highlights the many many good things that people who have autism can do and just shows how much awareness there still needs to be surrounding it.

    Kelly Glen.

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  11. The experts thought at one time that my grandson was on the spectrum but luckily they were wrong. Our world was nearly turned upside down at the time but we learned a lot through it

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  12. Good information - thank you for the giveaway

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  13. Thank you for raising awareness

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  14. This is a fantastic article! A lot more needs to be done to raise awareness. Every autistic person is unique. My son and my friend's daughter are both autistic and completely different. I love the phrase 'when you've met a person with autism, you've met a person with autism'.

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  15. Thanks for raising awareness

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  16. many thanks for raising awareness about Autism spectrum disorder. I studied a year at university, covering special eductational needs & disabilities, and I now have a great insight into Autism and how best to support children and adults with Autism. x

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  17. Great for raising the awareness of Autisim

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  18. There's still far too little understanding of this complex condition that I think touches all of us in some way, whether it is from having the condition ourselves or having a friend or family member with it.

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  19. A brilliant post with a lot of fantastic information!

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  20. The autism is caused by bad parenting is terrible.

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  21. Great cause I have several friends who have autistic children

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  22. Love these, my cousin is Autistic, and is doing great! thanks for the chance

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  23. It's amazing how quick people are to want to put a label on illnesses they don't understand. Or how quickly they assume that everyone suffers in the same way. It's a shame more information isn't shared in schools so that our next generation has a more understanding attitude

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  24. Thank you for the chance. I'd love to win these for my cousin who has an autistic son.

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  25. Great article, thank you for helping to dispel these unhelpful myths!

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  26. My 10 year old was diagnosed 4 years ago and he calls it his add-bility as he thinks that it brings abilities along with it! Great article.

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  27. As the mother of 3 boys on the spectrum I applaud anything which raises awareness & understanding of autism x

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  28. Thank you for raising awareness such a good article

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  29. Thank you for raising awareness - major milestone today my asd son followed in his older brother footsteps and did his first real job outside the home by by mowing the neighbors lawn - naturally he did a fantastic job and will be earning his bpocket money on a regular basis

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  30. So glad awareness is being raised. As it was always masked when I was a child. I'm so glad it's talked about more and more positively as well now.

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  31. these are beautiful - I actually really like that more people are aware of autism and the different conditions /things that go with it

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  32. my grandson has a form of autism, there is many forms, I did not know that fact until I looked into autism

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  33. Thank you for putting this info up its really helpful ☺

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  34. I have 2 children with autism and they are my absolute heroes and inspire me everyday

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  35. The sooner the (many times) shocking myths that surround Autism(and all learning/development/mental illnesses/conditions for that matter) are debunked, the better this world would be!

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  36. I have taught many children with autism. They are children first and foremost, and as unique as everyone else.

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  37. Autism does not affect me personally but everyone is unique and it's great to make people more aware and help people understand

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  38. Thank you for the information.

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